Always Wanted to be a Reiter

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Happy 258th birthday John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham

Happy birthday John!

(YES, the 10th, not the 9th. Have you not been paying attention?)

Anyway, I’ve written a blog post about his childhood for the occasion. You can read it at my author’s blog here:

http://tinyurl.com/p3qb42j

Filed under john pitt 2nd earl of chatham second earl of chatham john pitt earl of chatham lord chatham earl of chatham william pitt william pitt the elder pitt the elder the elder pitt 10 october 1756

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ardentpittite:

sylvanus-urban:

Kett’s History the Interpreter of Prophecy (1799), vols 1, 2, 3.
One of a long tradition of works attempting to interpret historical and current events as fulfilments of biblical prophecy. Not surprisingly, Kett equates revolutionary France with the “Infidel Power” which, together with “Popery” and “Mahometanism”, constitute the Antichrist whose reign is supposed to precede the final triumph of Christianity at the “end time”.

The book’s dedicatee was Pitt’s friend, erstwhile secretary and former tutor, George Pretyman (aka Tomline), Bishop of Lincoln:
In his Preface, Kett makes a further gushing acknowledgement of his obligation to Pretyman, and also confesses that he shares authorship with another person:
From this Person, whose name I am not at liberty to mention, and whose anxiety for the success of this Publication is perfectly disinterested, I have not only received many judicious corrections of what I had written, but such valuable communications as are deservedly substituted for many of the materials which I had prepared for the press.
This anon was in fact Pretyman’s wife, Elizabeth; so given the couple’s heavy involvement in the book, it’s no surprise to find in Pretyman’s own Elements of Christian Theology, published the same year, a direct plug:
A couple of years later, in December 1801, Mrs Pretyman managed to engineer a conversation with Pitt about “her” book (the following two passages are taken from a post on my friend anoondayeclipse's wonderful blog, The Private Life of William Pitt):
I had a very very interesting Conversation with Mr Pitt upon several subjects, one of which was the origin of my writing History The Interpreter of Prophesy as an apology to apparent prescription. He expressed himself in the kindest manner possible, said he had heard it very highly spoken of - that at the Time it came into his hands his mind was pressed with other things, but that he certainly would read it again (he had not read it all) with great attention, and tell me really what he thought of it, as he was sure he might do so. - I then said, I had a marked Copy which I would order to be put into his Carriage if he would give me leave. He caught at this most eagerly and said he would read it immediately, and begin it as he went to Town. - I observed he would find I differ’d from him upon some points … and that it was extraordinary that events should have justified me so compleatly. He seemed struck with this … and said with a feeling sigh I shall never forget, his eyes suffused with tears of sensibility, “Perhaps if I had happened to study the subject I might have adopted more fortunate measures - I could only judge from what I saw to be the actual state of things, but if I had had your ideas relative to France I certainly should have considered ideas formed upon circumstances merely human as subservient to them. - As it was, I don’t know that I could not act otherwise than I did!” - This was said in a tone of regret and of feeling for his Country that I think no man but himself could have done. - I instantly replied “You surely could not Sir. - You considered the subject politically only, I considered it religiously.” - “Just so.”
A few days later, Mrs Pretyman received this account from her husband, who had just breakfasted with Pitt in London:
We had scarcely begun breakfast when he entered upon Mr. Kett’s Book. - he said he read as long as there was any light in his way to town, and got through the first Chap. - he said that he was “exceedingly pleased” and very much struck by the minuteness of the circumstances - that there was only one thing wanting to make it [a] compleat demonstration, namely, to prove that the Books containing the Prophecies existed in their present state prior to the Events, of which he added he had not the slightest doubt, - that then the argument from Prophecy would be the simplest and most convincing possible. - He did not mention this as a defect in the work, for he considered it as both fair and right for this point to be taken for granted in a work where it could not be properly placed, but only as the one thing wanting to make that Vol. [a] compleat demonstration. He called it “an admirable Work,” observed how very large a portion of it was written by you, treating Mr. Kett’s share as nothing, and noticed the extensive Reading necessary for the writing of it. - He thought you right, considering your feelings, in remaining concealed, that you certainly did forego a great deal of credit, but you avoided an impression which though unjust would not be very pleasant to you. - He meant that of Authorship according to its general meaning when applied to women. I assure you, my dearest Love, he spoke of the subject, the execution & the Writer exactly as you and I could have wished. He expressed himself determined to go on with it, and is aware that the latter part is more interesting even than the former - he seemed impatient to read what remains. He said he was tempted to begin at the second Chap., but that he had not yielded to the temptation as thinking it not fair towards you.
Proof, surely, that the Pretymans (aka Tomlines) were as hideous as they were hilarious.

Bwahahahahahahaha. :-)And I didn’t think Eliza Pretyman could sink any lower in my estimation…

ardentpittite:

sylvanus-urban:

Kett’s History the Interpreter of Prophecy (1799), vols 1, 2, 3.

One of a long tradition of works attempting to interpret historical and current events as fulfilments of biblical prophecy. Not surprisingly, Kett equates revolutionary France with the “Infidel Power” which, together with “Popery” and “Mahometanism”, constitute the Antichrist whose reign is supposed to precede the final triumph of Christianity at the “end time”.

The book’s dedicatee was Pitt’s friend, erstwhile secretary and former tutor, George Pretyman (aka Tomline), Bishop of Lincoln:

In his Preface, Kett makes a further gushing acknowledgement of his obligation to Pretyman, and also confesses that he shares authorship with another person:

From this Person, whose name I am not at liberty to mention, and whose anxiety for the success of this Publication is perfectly disinterested, I have not only received many judicious corrections of what I had written, but such valuable communications as are deservedly substituted for many of the materials which I had prepared for the press.

This anon was in fact Pretyman’s wife, Elizabeth; so given the couple’s heavy involvement in the book, it’s no surprise to find in Pretyman’s own Elements of Christian Theology, published the same year, a direct plug:

A couple of years later, in December 1801, Mrs Pretyman managed to engineer a conversation with Pitt about “her” book (the following two passages are taken from a post on my friend anoondayeclipse's wonderful blog, The Private Life of William Pitt):

I had a very very interesting Conversation with Mr Pitt upon several subjects, one of which was the origin of my writing History The Interpreter of Prophesy as an apology to apparent prescription. He expressed himself in the kindest manner possible, said he had heard it very highly spoken of - that at the Time it came into his hands his mind was pressed with other things, but that he certainly would read it again (he had not read it all) with great attention, and tell me really what he thought of it, as he was sure he might do so. - I then said, I had a marked Copy which I would order to be put into his Carriage if he would give me leave. He caught at this most eagerly and said he would read it immediately, and begin it as he went to Town. - I observed he would find I differ’d from him upon some points … and that it was extraordinary that events should have justified me so compleatly. He seemed struck with this … and said with a feeling sigh I shall never forget, his eyes suffused with tears of sensibility, “Perhaps if I had happened to study the subject I might have adopted more fortunate measures - I could only judge from what I saw to be the actual state of things, but if I had had your ideas relative to France I certainly should have considered ideas formed upon circumstances merely human as subservient to them. - As it was, I don’t know that I could not act otherwise than I did!” - This was said in a tone of regret and of feeling for his Country that I think no man but himself could have done. - I instantly replied “You surely could not Sir. - You considered the subject politically only, I considered it religiously.” - “Just so.”

A few days later, Mrs Pretyman received this account from her husband, who had just breakfasted with Pitt in London:

We had scarcely begun breakfast when he entered upon Mr. Kett’s Book. - he said he read as long as there was any light in his way to town, and got through the first Chap. - he said that he was “exceedingly pleased” and very much struck by the minuteness of the circumstances - that there was only one thing wanting to make it [a] compleat demonstration, namely, to prove that the Books containing the Prophecies existed in their present state prior to the Events, of which he added he had not the slightest doubt, - that then the argument from Prophecy would be the simplest and most convincing possible. - He did not mention this as a defect in the work, for he considered it as both fair and right for this point to be taken for granted in a work where it could not be properly placed, but only as the one thing wanting to make that Vol. [a] compleat demonstration. He called it “an admirable Work,” observed how very large a portion of it was written by you, treating Mr. Kett’s share as nothing, and noticed the extensive Reading necessary for the writing of it. - He thought you right, considering your feelings, in remaining concealed, that you certainly did forego a great deal of credit, but you avoided an impression which though unjust would not be very pleasant to you. - He meant that of Authorship according to its general meaning when applied to women. I assure you, my dearest Love, he spoke of the subject, the execution & the Writer exactly as you and I could have wished. He expressed himself determined to go on with it, and is aware that the latter part is more interesting even than the former - he seemed impatient to read what remains. He said he was tempted to begin at the second Chap., but that he had not yielded to the temptation as thinking it not fair towards you.

Proof, surely, that the Pretymans (aka Tomlines) were as hideous as they were hilarious.

Bwahahahahahahaha. :-)

And I didn’t think Eliza Pretyman could sink any lower in my estimation…

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I’ve been absent a while, but I have a good excuse.

I finished my penultimate draft today!

On target to finish by the end of the year :-D

Filed under writing

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Pitt and Fox in the House of Commons

ardentpittite:

An interesting eyewitness account by a visiting American, from June 1805.

Although Mr. Pitt remained silent with respect to the motion on the state of the army, I had the pleasure of hearing this great man speak a few minutes on a petition which he handed in. There was nothing in the subject…

Oh, this is splendid. Thank you for sharing!

Filed under william pitt pitt the younger the younger pitt william pitt the younger charles james fox

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Breaking the radio silence only briefly to note that I saw this on Facebook just now (regarding a discussion on converting a modern paperback into a suitably 1800s-looking re-enacting prop). Take particular note of the bottom comment:

image

Now why did I immediately think of joachimmurat and various other Tumblr peeps?

Filed under marshalate you guys have scarred me for life

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Pitt the Younger’s death mask: a blog post by Stephenie Woolterton

History peeps may be interested in (if ever so slightly creeped out by) my friend Stephenie Woolterton’s latest post on her excellent blog, The Private Life of William Pitt the Younger. (Steph also blogs here occasionally as anoondayeclipse.)

She has unearthed some previously unseen photographs of Pitt the Younger’s death mask, taken for the sculptor Nollekens the day after Pitt died.

They are amazing— rather gruesome, and it is certainly evident that Pitt was in a very, very bad way, but without a doubt the closest we will get to a photograph of Mr Pitt’s face.

Brace yourselves and take a look.

http://www.theprivatelifeofpitt.com/2014/07/an-original-plaster-cast-of-william.html?spref=fb&m=1

Filed under william pitt pitt the younger the younger pitt william pitt the younger death mask pitt's death stephenie woolterton the private life of pitt a noonday eclipse anoondayeclipse

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"The mischief done me": all change at the Admiralty, 1794

My guest post for the English Historical Fiction Authors blog on the dismissal of the 2nd Earl of Chatham from the Admiralty went up today:

http://englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/the-mischief-done-me-all-change-at.html?m=1

Quite proud of this one.

Filed under 2nd earl of chatham second earl of chatham john pitt 2nd lord chatham second lord chatham lord chatham william pitt pitt the younger william pitt the younger the younger pitt admiralty 1794 first lord of the admiralty henry dundas 18th century british politics 18th century politics ehfa English historical fiction authors guest post

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John and Mary’s wedding, 10 July 1783

Mary, Countess of Chatham and John, 2nd Earl of Chatham by Charles Rosenburg (ca 1800)

Mary, Countess of Chatham and John, 2nd Earl of Chatham by Charles Rosenburg (ca 1800)

I know it’s a day early, but I’d like to post in honour of the 231st wedding anniversary of John, 2nd Earl of Chatham and his wife Mary Elizabeth Townshend and I can’t guarantee I’ll manage tomorrow. They are obviously the main characters of my WIP and I have done a lot of research on their lives in the past year. Not all my discoveries have been pleasant, but I have learned a lot about them and I feel much closer to them now than I did this time last year. (You can read last year’s post about their marriage settlement here.)

John and Mary were married by special licence at the house of Mary’s father, Thomas Townshend, Lord Sydney, on 10 July 1783. John was twenty-six, Mary twenty. They had known each other since they were children and it was a love match between longtime sweethearts. Despite rumours that John had a mistress I have not been able to substantiate them, and on the contrary all the evidence points to the closeness of their relationship. The marriage was destined to last nearly thirty-eight years, coming to an end when Mary died on 21 May 1821 at the age of fifty-eight.

As husband and wife the pair suffered more than their fair share of trials and tribulations. Mary’s health was always poor. She suffered from some sort of premature-onset arthritis in her hip that left her permanently lame, and never managed to carry a child to term, although she miscarried at least once. She shared in all her husband’s twists and turns of fortune, accompanying him as much as she could on his military postings throughout Britain, and retiring with him into political obscurity after he commanded the disastrous Walcheren expedition in 1809. In 1807 Mary suffered a prolonged mental breakdown, and although she recovered she relapsed more or less permanently in 1818. You can read more about John and Mary in my guest posts for “Madame Gilflurt’s” excellent blog.

I’d like to leave you with a short excerpt from my WIP in which I describe John and Mary’s wedding. Please join me in raising a glass of claret to the happy couple!


 

Albemarle Street, July 1783

`My lord Chatham, if you will repeat after me…’

Mary’s heart beat a hectic rhythm in her chest as Dr Courtenay, the parish rector, took the ring off the Bible and slipped it onto her finger. She did not take her eyes off John for a moment. He wore a cream silk suit trimmed with silver to match her gown. His hair was immaculately curled and powdered and his eyes held hers with an intensity that made her heart beat faster. He echoed Courtenay’s words, precisely and with great concentration.

`With this ring I thee wed. With my body I thee worship, and with all my worldly goods I thee endow. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, Amen.’

`Those whom God hath joined together let no man put asunder,’ Courtenay said. John put his hand over Mary’s; the sensation of his warm flesh pressing the cold band of the ring into her finger sent a shiver of excitement through her. `I pronounce that they be man and wife together. My lord, you may kiss your bride.’

The wedding guests applauded as John leaned down to bestow a chaste kiss on his wife’s lips. Mary saw his eyes dart towards the chairs arranged before the windows of her parents’ drawing-room. Her father, created Viscount Sydney in one of Lord Shelburne’s parting acts as minister, sat beaming a few feet away. Arrayed beside him were his wife and Mary’s six siblings, from Georgiana to three-year-old Horatio, sucking his thumb on his eldest sister’s lap. Behind were William and Harriot, both grinning broadly.

Mary knew how self-conscious John could be in front of an audience, but she had no intention of letting him get away with that kiss. She wrapped her arms around her husband’s neck and murmured into his ear. `Does Mary, Countess of Chatham not return your kisses so sweetly as Miss Mary Townshend?’

His face cleared instantly. `I do not know. Perhaps we should put it to the test?’

He cupped her chin and kissed her again. In an instant her world narrowed down to the sensation of his lips against hers and Lord Sydney’s elegant drawing-room, with all its inhabitants, was lost to her.

Mary kept her hand in John’s as the guests came over to congratulate them. Her father and mother led the way, enormous smiles on their faces. Lady Sydney kissed John on each cheek. Lord Sydney pumped John’s hand up and down, unable to say anything other than `Well done, Chatham, well done indeed,’ for all the world as though John had just won Mary in single combat.  Last came William and Harriot. Harriot slipped her hand through her new sister-in-law’s arm and William clasped John’s hand with genuine pleasure.

`You look fine, John, very fine,’ William said.

`Marriage suits you,’ Harriot observed. Her eyes were like John’s: they had the same heavy-lidded, almond shape, the same shade of greyish-blue flecked with brown, fringed with the same dark lashes, but Harriot’s were full of a mischief Mary had never seen in her husband’s. `Why, you nearly look handsome.’

`Only nearly?’

`You know Harriot,’ William said. `She never flatters. But as far as I am concerned you look splendid. Lady Chatham too.’ Mary glanced over her shoulder, half-expecting to see that John’s mother had just entered the room, then realised William was talking about her and felt the blood rush to her cheeks. `Congratulations, my lady. Welcome to our family.’

`Too late to change your mind I’m afraid,’ Harriot put in.

`I don’t think I want to,’ Mary said. She could not help slanting a mischievous look up at her husband. John smiled back and dropped a brief kiss on her lips.

`I am glad to hear it!’

He spoke flippantly and Harriot and William laughed, but Mary detected strain in his voice. When he was not paying attention she looked at him more carefully, peeling away the silver-lined coat, the pomaded, curled hair, and the aura of quiet gentility and pride he wore like a cloak. She saw the pallor of his skin and the tightness around his eyes and thought: He is as nervous as I am. She wondered if she was the only one to notice, for even William and Harriot continued to jest at him as though they did not see his jaw tighten further with each joke.

It was as though she could see him better than anyone else in the room, as though her love were a filter stripping away everything but the raw thoughts and emotions that made him John. She took his arm and he turned to her with a smile she was beginning to recognise belonged only to her. The connection between them felt more than physical, as though if Mary withdrew her arm she would still be holding him, even if they were hundreds of miles apart.

Filed under john pitt 2nd earl of chatham second earl of chatham john pitt earl of chatham john earl of chatham mary elizabeth townshend mary elizabeth pitt mary elizabeth countess of chatham countess of chatham lady chatham wedding marriage 10 july 1783 the long shadow excerpt

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http://alwayswantedtobeareiter.tumblr.com/post/88398095675/you-can-tell-a-lot-about-someone-by-the-type-of

velvethatlady:

alwayswantedtobeareiter:

You can tell a lot about someone by the type of music they listen to.

Hit shuffle on your iPod, phone, iTunes, whatever it is you listen to music on and then write down the first 20 songs that come up. No skipping!

Thank you for tagging me, ladycashasatiger! I warn people in advance that…

Alwayswantedtobeareiter, apologies for late reply, I’ve been run off my feet helping a friend move house!  Not sure I’m going to thank you for tagging me because not only am I the queen of uncool middle of the road classical music, I do not have an iPod or music on my phone so I had to shut my eyes and pluck random offerings from my collection of gramophone records CDs.  The temptation to cheat is almost unbearable but you didn’t so I won’t :)

Bizet - Carmen

Teenage Kicks - 80s stuff

Mozart Requiem x 2!

Rameau - Les Indes Galantes

Faure Requiem

Verdi Requiem

Brahms German Requiem

Gilbert & Sullivan - Iolanthe

Bach - Mass in B Minor

Rameau - Hippolyte and Aricie

Eighties Number 1s

Schubert freebie compilation

Purcell - Music for Queen Mary’s Funeral

Culture Club - This Time

Amadeus soundtrack

Adagio Religioso - compilation

Elvis Presley No1 Hits

Grieg - Peer Gynt Suite

Beethoven freebie compilation

You are WAY cooler than me. :-D

Thanks for playing and sorry….! Hope the move went well!

Filed under velvethatlady

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theironduchess:

davoutseaworth:

theironduchess:

joachimmurat:

davoutseaworth:

syuminiki:

Napoleon’s Marshals,General,Napoleon Family ,Russia,Austria ,UK

manga Kisida Ren, Hasegawa Tetuya

The middle ones are so cute!!!

The middle ones are super cute and surprisingly really true to life. bless.

Pitt’s nose though. He looks like MP Pinocchio trying to fool Parliament into believing he isn’t a liar, and chopped off part of his nose to remove the extra length gained from political humbuggery.

Well. he had quite a peculiar nose, let’s be honest.

But not a button nose (???) as this manga implies. 

@alwayswantedtobeareiter Leading expert on the noses of members of the Pitt family, what do you make of this? 

I was wondering more about a) who decided Pitt actually had a chin, and b) what the HECK kind of monstrosity is the righthand depiction?! Gah! It’s actually quite scary! :-/

But yes, while the lefthand depiction is certainly I’d say more recognisable as Pitt, he looks like a Pitt who just took a slurp from his latte and nobody has yet mustered the courage to tell him he’s got a dab of it on the end of his nose.